Skip to content

October 14, 2011

2

on taking things for granted, and how we spiritually bypass…

by Repa Dorje Odzer

In re-examining The Biographies of Rechungpa by Peter Alan Roberts for an earlier post, I came across  details surrounding the colophon from the Life and Songs of Milarepa that are quite illuminating.  Roberts suggests that the 14th century collection of songs, known as the Life and Songs Shepay Dorje,  the source for what is popularly known in translation as The Hundred Thousand Songs of Milarepa, was actually intended to be a secret text; a text with a limited readership- a special means through which one might receive instruction and inspiration from Jey Milarepa himself. I find it particularly fascinating that this book, which can commonly be found in any number of bookstores, was once intended to only be shared by repas who were undergoing training in a manner similar to that of Jetsun Milarepa and his cotton-clad disciples.  This piece of information illustrates, for me, how easily I have taken this book for granted as well the height of regard for which this particular set of teaching songs has been held.

Of course this is common with many books that one finds in any section of a bookstore that offers a selection of books on Tibetan Buddhism or Vajrayana.  One can easily purchase translations of The Six Yogas of Naropa, or texts on Mahamudra or Dzogchen, Yidam practice, Chöd and other topics whose surrounding lineages of practice are still kept secret and guarded out of respect for the efficacy of such practices.   Very few Tibetan monks, and unfortunately even fewer nuns, had access to these same texts that we now throw in the back of the car, fail to re-shelve at the bookstore, or even just casually leave out on a coffee table or the floor for that matter.  If we like, for not that much money, we can purchase a translation of the Chakrasamvara and Hevajra Tantras or commentaries of the Guhyasamaja Tantra.  You say you want a copy of the Karnatantra; the Bodyless Dakini teachings that Rechungpa brought from India to Tibet?  No problem- if you want, it can even be delivered right to your home.

It’s fair to say that the genesis of most of these works is unknown.  By this, I mean that while there may be a known attribution and transmission lineage specific to each text; a world completely unto itself;  it took an unknown process that lead to the spiritual experience which inspiried the composition/revelation of these texts.  Truly understanding what rests at the source of these works, and what they point out is difficult.  The experiences of Tilopa or Naropa, of Aryadeva, or Krishnacharya are difficult to fathom.  Yet we have their works in translation- manuals of liberation techniques, pages blessed by the buddha qualities embodied by each master who revealed them.  While the majority of tantric Buddhist texts haven’t been translated, those that have- core lineage texts- are readily available.

One might ask, “Well, if access to all of these wonderful meditation manuals is so easily obtained, this must truly be a boon for our practice, no?”  Indeed, this is a wonderful thing, we are very lucky to not have to risk our life to obtain access to the dharma as many in the past have had to.  And yet, every wonderful thing also has a potential shadow, and I wonder about how easy it is to become jaded by all this easy access.  Occasionally, I worry about easily we take for granted just one book which may represent the entire life experience, the great inner struggles and blissful insights, the fears of mediocrity, and the sense of grounding of such great teachers like Milarepa, and Machig Labdron, to name just two.  Just one book contains the realizations of an entire lifetime.  It contains an entire world.  Yet it is easy to find that one book is often replaced by another, consumed with an ease and sense of entitlement that may perhaps undermine the very sacred meaning behind the genesis of each book.  It is quite possible that before we know it, we have a personal library of the translated oral instructions of a variety of wisdom traditions while our inner spiritual flame, our interior process, struggles to maintain itself.  It’s easy to take all this wonderous access for granted; to become “spiritually engorged”.

Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche treats this problem within his classic work Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism, and Robert Augustus Masters offers a wonderful honest treatment of this within his work Spiritual Bypassing: When Spirituality Disconnects Us from What Really Matters.  Spiritual bypassing a term for the way that we use our spirituality to separate us from honestly feeling our emotions and from using our spirituality to defend our own faults and shadows.   It is amazing how little growth and self-exploration we can allow ourselves through justifying our habits, our easy reactions and our shadows by chalking them up to “wrathful activity” (You know, I’m angry and that’s why I practice Mahakala), through the nature of ultimate reality (It’s all just an illusion anyway), or by being overly nice and compassionate as a means to feel better about ourselves and (sometimes to make us feel better than others).

What happens when we become jaded?  When we say things like, “yeah, I know about all of the aspects of completion stage meditation from all the books that I have read”, what are we really saying?  It sounds to me as if we have cut ourselves off from intimately knowing ourselves.  It sounds as if we are hiding behind knowledge and not allowing the often messy and painful process of insight and wisdom about ourselves to occur.

I have come across a number of very well read Buddhists who have read and memorized great quantities of Buddhist texts who also seemed to lack basic concern for others- who would snap at those with lesser learning, and even refuse to offer support for those around them who were struggling.  As if hypnotized by the wonderful image of the inner cartography that they were studying, they had become separated from the awareness that in order to start a journey we must put the map down so that we can actually begin.  If we try to read a map and walk simultaneously we easily lose our orientation.

I’ve also seen many folks shun basic bodhicitta practice for practices that deal in a more head-on way with emptiness; more secret practices, higher ones, implying that loving kindness is basic.  Actually, it can be excruciating to try to be there for others.  Kindness in the face of adversity, or aversion for that matter, is not as easy as reading a book about it.  It can be much more convenient to rest in the thought that “my self-centeredness doesn’t exist, it’s empty of any self-nature”- therefore it’s unnecessary to really look at it in the face to see where it’s coming from.

There is also the phenomena where disciples of teachers maintain a sceptical eye and caustic attitude towards other fellow students, other dharma siblings, for whom being part of the inner-circle is something of an eddy that they become stuck in along the river of thier spiritual life.  They fail to realize that we have all of the most wonderful inner-circles within us.  Why exclude others?

In wondering about all of the ways that we fool ourselves as we take things for granted, my curiosity often moves towards my own spiritual bypassing; around my periodic naiveté, and the way I take for granted all of the easy access I have had to the Dharma over the past fifteen years.  I can acknowledge my hard work, my own personal insights and feel gratitude for my inner growth, but it is very humbling to notice how all of these wonderful sides of the spiritual path can be forgotten when I fall out of connection with others, or when I do not maintain a certain critical eye regarding my practice, or when I shy away from difficulty with unconscious ease.  I’m sure that many readers can identify with some aspect of my experience, we have all done these things and it often goes unnoticed.  When we apply the rosy light of spirituality to our behaviour that is rooted in hiding from others, hiding from our pain, and retreating into separation, we can very easily find wonderful defenses, wonderful ways to support us in not growing, in not changing (which is what growth is), and with not experiencing pain- a profound impetus for, and perhaps symptom of, growth.  Sometimes we take for granted that we know ourselves at all.

These days its possible to receive dozens of empowerments, many different specific instructions, meet with many different spiritual teachers, and read many books that in the past were kept concealed, hidden to be revealed at the right time for maximum effect in one’s spiritual practice.  That’s a lot of stuff.  It’s not all bad, but it also seems possible for one to inadvertently suffer from a form of “spiritual diabetes” for lack of a better term.  We have so much.  Need so much.  Often, we want so much.  Do all the extra things, the personal libraries of sutra and tantra, the mountains of blessed substances from our teachers, make our spirituality more honest, stronger, more humble?  Does that make it better?  Why do we need it?

In my own life, I know that when I am plagued by my feelings of inadequacy or lack, I sometimes think, “Hmm.  Maybe I should go back to India.  Maybe I should go see my lama and ask for a really wrathful practice to get rid of these feelings”.  To get rid of these feelings.  In essence to split with them, to create a subtle distinction between those hard feelings and what I have an idea about what I should be feeling.  I’m sure that others can identify with the feelings behind this kind of thinking.  It’s a form of running away, a way of not facing with what I am feeling right now, of not being with what is arising in the moment and trying to get to know what it means, to notice its origin, and it’s effect- of creating further duality.  Where does my feeling of lack and inadequacy come from?

In the parlance of Chöd practice: can I let go of holding on to the demon of lack and inadequacy?  Rather than go on pilgrimage somewhere to accumulate merit when we feel terrible, what if we went on pilgrimage with ourselves?  Rather than hiding, or hoping that adding a new practice will solve our deeply rooted suffering, what if we stopped, and touched the earth, as the buddha did and experienced the torment, our maras, and begin to enter into relationship with them?  What would happen if we stopped buying books for a while, stopped seeking out the next teaching, and really sat with what we have.  I suspect that we would find that we are more full than we recognize at first glance- that we have all that we need already.

Advertisements
2 Comments Post a comment
  1. :)
    Oct 15 2011

    Welcome back. This is such an amazing post. I can say that when I open google reader I always look to see if you have posted. Those days are few but each of those posts requires multiple reading over days to get and chew upon. Thank You for this incredible gift. I am truly blessed 🙂

    Buddhists especially those of the Gelukpa tradition (being one myself) find it easy to get away from compassion – greater or smaller. Then it just becomes more spiritual materialism. Spiritual materialism, my biggest foe, I have seen your face and it is same as mine ;(

    Reply
    • Thank you for your kind words; that my thoughts can help make life more rich fills me with gratitude.
      Whether it be spiritual materialism or spiritual bypassing, perhaps the most encouraging thing is noticing it as it arises; this awareness is powerful. It could even be looked at as a form of shinay/samatha. The individual paths that we have laid out before us all are unique and mysterious, above all us it feels important to me to say that we should be kind to ourselves as we notice our inner demons/foes. How do they arise? What is their root? Can we take some time to notice what is beyond the edges of these impulses? There is so much; and so much wealth- even in our struggles.

      Thank you for following Ganachakra!

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Note: HTML is allowed. Your email address will never be published.

Subscribe to comments

%d bloggers like this: